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29 Of The Most Beautiful Cats In The World

4- Nosebleeds

Nosebleeds are never normal, says Dr. Rocha. “With an older cat, a nosebleed is particularly worrisome. It can be a sign of cat cancer in the nose,” he says. “With younger cats, I would worry more about something like a foreign object stuck up there before cancer.”

5- Diarrhea or changes in bathroom habits

Occasional diarrhea usually isn’t a sign of cat cancer, says Dr. Rocha, but if it persists or gets worse, bring your cat to the vet. Excessive litter box use, difficulty peeing/moving bowels, or blood in urine or stool are also potential signs of cancer, according to PetMD.com. Pay attention to frequent vomiting—it could just be hairballs or upset stomach, but it’s also a presenting sign of GI tumors, says Dr. Zaidel.

6- Discharge

Persistent discharge from the nose or eyes is cause for concern, says Dr. Zaidel. Nasal discharge is a common sign of facial tumors, and eye discharge can signal an eye tumor.

7- Seizures

Seizures can be a sign of brain tumors in cats, most often seen in older cats with cancer, says Dr. Zaidel. If you start to notice sudden and uncontrolled bursts of activity, like champing and chewing, jerking of the legs, or foaming at the mouth, your cat could be experiencing seizures and you should see a vet immediately. Cats can also suffer atypical seizures, which aren’t classic convulsions but instead manifest as fits of strange behavior, like sudden rage or hysteria, excessive licking or chewing, or scratching or biting their owner.

 

 

 

 

 

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